12/25/2010

The New Qingpu Wetlands, a design proposal by Logon Architecture

While huge urbanization is transforming Chinese society, the question we must ask is: what about sustainability? German-based Logon Architecture reveals their new proposal "the New Qingpu Wetland" for the city Qingpu, an industrial city of the urban megapolis of Shanghai.
The Qingpu Wetlands — Birdview from the south, Logon Architecture, Qingpu, China, © Logon Architecture

The main idea of Logon Architecture's proposal is to create a natural ecological wetland mixing sustainable system, smallest financial investment and smallest maintenance.
The Qingpu Waterlands — Master Plan, Logon Architecture, Qingpu, China, © Logon Architecture

Wetlands are considered the most biologically diverse of all ecosystems. They are usually inhabited by plants and animals and can serve as wastewater purification systems or for other objectives.
It has been said that wetlands perform two specific functions in relation to global warming and climate changes: (1) mitigation effects through their ability to sink carbon; (2) adaptation effects throuh their ability to store and regulate water.
It is possible that Logon Architecture interrogate these two functions with this Qingpu Wetlands design proposal as biomes, ecosystem, preservation are central in this project. Construction and maintenance will be simple and cost efficient.
The Qingpu Wetlands — Harbor, Logon Architecture, Qingpu, China, © Logon Architecture. Originally appeared on ArchDaily
The Qingpu Wetlands — Birdview from the west, Logon Architecture, Qingpu China, © Logon Architecture

The utilization of the site's potential allows the creation of an ecological sustained unit: the park will develop local plants with strong anti-reversion forces, water and land. Plants will have certain capacities of purification with comprehensive usable value.  Rare and local animals will house the park. A micro-organism environment will be created. The combination of these elements: land, local plants, local and rare animal, micro-organism environment and water will help supporting a naturally balanced environment.
The Qingpu Wetlands — Ecosystem, Logon Architecture, Qingpu, China, © Logon Architecture. Originally appeared on Archdaily

The Path of Experience will be added around and between these elements. This Path of Experience will weave up to 4m above ground. This results in an interaction of visitors and local residents and nature.
The Qingpu Wetlands — The three-dimensional Paths, Logon Architecture, Qingpu, China,  Logon Architecture. Originally appeared on Archdaily
The park will be constructed of locally grown wood and bamboo.
The Qingpu Wetlands — The site sections, Logon Architecture, Qingpu, China, © Logon Architecture. Originally appeared on ArchDaily
The wetlands will be connected in non-intrusive ways to surrounding urban areas by bus and ferry. A deck for river transportation will be created to host the ferry. The choice for this two types of transportation, which are more ecological, is to prohibit vehicle access. In the future, amount of visitors will be controlled in order to preserve the ecosystem: only pedestrians will be allowed on the site and access will be restricted to the three-dimensional path, activity spaces and platforms.
The Qingpu Wetlands — Traffic, Logon Architecture, Qingpu, China, © Logon Architecture. Originally appeared on Archdaily

The park will preserve the lifeline of the Dian Pu River. Paths will be created for a quiet stroll and views areas to watch ships circulating on the river.
The Qingpu Wetlands —The Vertical Design, Logon Architecture, Qingpu, China, © Logon Architecture. Originally appeared on ArchDaily

The Qingpu Wetlands will attempt to mix ecologically sustainable cities and economic and urban development.
The Qingpu Wetlands — Render, Logon Architecture, Qingpu, China, © Logon Architecture

Technical Data
Project: Qingpu Wetlands
Architects: Logon Architecture
Location: Qingpu, Megalopolis of Shanghai, China
Site area: 68.6 ha
Drawing, renders are courtesy © Logon Architecture
Some images (drawings) are originally appeared on ArchDaily

No comments:

Pageviews last month