1/31/2011

A Morphogenetic Library in Florence by Tommaso Casucci

I discovered this project which consists of a design proposal, for a new library for the school of architecture in one of the most interesting Architecture magazines evolo. This project is designed by Italian architect Tommaso Casucci. The school of Architecture is located at the limit of the old city of Florence, Italy.
Tommaso Casucci's design belongs to a renovation plan of large area of this school. Pre-existing spaces will be conserved. They, however, will be converted into Archive. The new addition will provide study areas, meeting spaces, auditorium, exhibition spaces.
The building looks like a porous "UFO" which seems to be "transplanted" in the School of Architecture site.
New Library for the School of Architecture, Florence — Model, Florence, Italy, © Tommaso Casucci.
Originally appeared on evolo.

This free-form-shaped building appears to be in perpetual evolution such as an organic system. The shape seems to be directly linked to the influences of external forces — surroundings, environmental constraints. It has been structured by site analysis data.
© Tommaso Casucci. Originally appeared on evolo.

Such a building requires the usage of tools, techniques and technologies in service of site such as the School of Architecture site. The skin seems to be bodily adapted to climate control and to environmental pressures as the diagram below shows. Computational design processes and advances in digital fabrication technologies allow architects to think about form-finding and space-making.
© Tommaso Casucci. Originally appeared on evolo.

This project belongs to "New materialism" in that it is, as Neri Oxman mentions (Architectural Design, vol.80 July-August 2010), based on the concept of "form first, structure first, material first". Precisely, this project stresses the "hierarchical nature of the design process with form being the first article of production, driving both structural and material strategies" (Oxman).
© Tommaso Casucci. Originally appears on evolo.
> Simulation of the building.
The building's evolution responding to various constraints.
Shape, structure and materials are linked to the influences
of internal and external forces acting on the building.

Tommaso Casucci's building is perforated allowing for a best diffusion of natural light and ventilation within the building in response to environmental constraints — urban contexts, bioclimatic issues, etc.
© Tommaso Casucci. Originally appears on evolo.

Surface porosity, Tommaso Casucci says, is based on triply periodic minimal surfaces structures to define a performative interface of bioclimatic regulation where irradiation values on the surface are used to module light perception in the interior spaces of the library. Hence this perforated morphogenetic structure.
© Tommaso Casucci. Originally appeared evolo.

Inner spaces differ from exterior since it is smooth to create a space for study quietly as if the architect wanted to protect users from exterior racket.
© Tommaso Casucci. Oiginally appeared on evolo.
> Natural light and ventilation penetrate the building through perforations providing best conditions of usage of the library spaces for the users .
© Tommaso Casucci. Originally appeared on evolo.
© Tommaso Casucci. Originally appeared on evolo.
© Tommaso Casucci. Originally appeared on evolo.
> The building appears to be an "UFO" transplanted in
a typical street in Florence.
© Tommaso Casucci. Originally appeared on evolo.
© Tommaso Casucci. Originally appeared on evolo.
> "the system explores how the modulation of isosurfaces, based
on intensive fields from site analysis data,
can achieve highly differentiated spaces and performative structures (T. Casucci)
© Tommaso Casucci. Originally appeared on evolo.
© Tommaso Casucci. Originally appeared on evolo.



Source: evolo

No comments:

Pageviews last month